Psalm 106  PDF  MSWord

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Go to Bible: Psalms 106
 
Psa 106:1(top)
Psa 106:2(top)
Psa 106:3(top)
Psa 106:4

“visit.” When God “visited” someone, He intervened in their life, and He could intervene for their blessing or to bring deserved consequences or punishment. Here in Psalm 106:4, the psalmist is asking for God to “visit” with the blessing of deliverance. [For more on God “visiting,” see commentary on Exod. 20:5].

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Psa 106:5(top)
Psa 106:6(top)
Psa 106:7(top)
Psa 106:8(top)
Psa 106:9(top)
Psa 106:10(top)
Psa 106:11(top)
Psa 106:12(top)
Psa 106:13(top)
Psa 106:14(top)
Psa 106:15(top)
Psa 106:16(top)
Psa 106:17(top)
Psa 106:18(top)
Psa 106:19(top)
Psa 106:20

“their Glory.” In this context, scholarly consensus is that “Glory” is being used as a appellative (or metonymy) for God Himself. There is some evidence that the original text said “my glory,” referring to the praise and honor due God, but that does not seem to fit as well with the last part of the verse. It makes more sense that the people exchanged God for an ox idol than exchanged God’s praise for an ox idol.

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Psa 106:21(top)
Psa 106:22(top)
Psa 106:23(top)
Psa 106:24(top)
Psa 106:25(top)
Psa 106:26(top)
Psa 106:27(top)
Psa 106:28

“yoked.” This Hebrew word only occurs here and Numbers 25:3 about the same incident (see commentary on Num. 25:3).

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Psa 106:29(top)
Psa 106:30(top)
Psa 106:31(top)
Psa 106:32(top)
Psa 106:33(top)
Psa 106:34(top)
Psa 106:35(top)
Psa 106:36(top)
Psa 106:37

“demons.” The Hebrew word is shed (#07700 שֵׁד), and means “demons.” The Greeks who translated the Septuagint understood that and translated shed into Greek as daimonion (#1140 δαιμόνιον), “demon,” an evil spirit being. The BDB Hebrew lexicon says that shed is a loan-word from the Assyrian šêdu, a protecting spirit, and that Psalm 106:37, which says the people sacrificed their sons and daughters to demons, is referring to human sacrifice. Putting Psalm 106:36-37 together leads us to conclude that the “idols” people worshipped were actually demons, and that is also what Paul said in 1 Cor. 10:20.

The ancient peoples understood there were many types of demons. Leviticus 17:7 mentions “goat-demons.”

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Psa 106:38(top)
Psa 106:39(top)
Psa 106:40(top)
Psa 106:41(top)
Psa 106:42(top)
Psa 106:43(top)
Psa 106:44(top)
Psa 106:45(top)
Psa 106:46(top)
Psa 106:47(top)
Psa 106:48(top)
  

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