Proverbs Chapter 25  PDF  MSWord

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Go to Bible: Proverbs 25
 
Pro 25:1(top)
Pro 25:2(top)
Pro 25:3(top)
Pro 25:4

“and a vessel comes out for the refiner.” This proverb is stretching the facts to make a point. Of course, when you remove the dross from silver, “a vessel” does not come out. Instead the silver is now ready for the silversmith. But the proverb is making the point that once the impurity is removed from the silver, the “vessel” almost appears on its own, automatically and quickly. That same thing is true of kingdoms, as the last part of the proverb says: “remove the wicked person from the presence of the king, and his throne will be established in righteousness” (Prov. 25:5). If the wicked people are removed from the presence of the king, then his throne will be established quickly; almost automatically.

This proverb has a wide application, because wicked people stop great things from happening in all organizations; in government, business, the Church, education, and more. Wicked people are prideful and selfish, and will not “go away” on their own. They have to be dealt with (Prov. 20:26).

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Pro 25:5(top)
Pro 25:6

“stand in the place of great men.” This means, don’t start out by standing (or taking a place) where the great men are, wait to be invited up to that place.

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Pro 25:7

“up…lower.” In a gathering, the “highest” person in power or rank would occupy the upmost seat or place, with the next highest next to him, then the next highest. The “lowest” place would be for the least honorable guest. Every banquet or festive occasion would have a host or guest of honor, and the seat closest to that person would be the “highest,” while the seat furthest away would be the lowest. It was always best to take a lower seat and have the host say, “Come up,” than to take a high seat and have the host move you down lower. So “Come up,” does not refer to up in height, but “up” closer to the most important person at the gathering (cp. Luke 14:10).

“What your eyes have seen.” This phrase almost certainly belongs together with the first line in Proverbs 25:8. This is supported by almost all the commentators (cp. Bruce Waltke; Roland Murphy; Crawford Toy; and William McKane) and also by many modern versions (cp. CJB; ESV; JPS; NAB; NIV; and more). It is also supported by the Septuagint. Thus, the full verse is: “What your eyes have seen, do not go out to argue about too hastily.”

This is an important verse when considering self-control and taking the time to get the facts of a situation before getting involved. It often happens that when a person hears or sees even a little bit of an argument, he immediately gets involved and takes a side in the argument. The wise person takes the time to gather facts before getting involved in a dispute.

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Pro 25:8

“do not go out.” This phrase goes with the last stanza in Proverbs 25:7. The full verse is: “What your eyes have seen, do not go out to argue about too hastily.”

“in the end.” The “end” is the end of the dispute, after you have lost your case. This is not referring to the eschatological end, the Day of the Lord.

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Pro 25:9(top)
Pro 25:10

“your bad reputation.” Or, “the bad report about you.”

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Pro 25:11

“apples.” Almost all of the sources concur that the fruit was likely an apricot, not an apple, and frankly we feel that “apricot” is correct. Nevertheless, some sources do support the translation “apples” against “apricots.” Due to the confusion on the issue, and the antiquity of the translation “apples,” that is what we used in the REV.

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Pro 25:12

“earring.” The Hebrew word simply means “ring,” but it was used of earrings, nose-rings, and finger rings. Generally, both men and women wore finger rings, women wore nose-rings because they could be easily seen, and some men wore earrings. Women did not generally wear earrings because their hair and often their head covering covered them up so no one could see them, so they generally wore nose-rings. The Hebrew word does not tell us what kind of ring Proverbs 25:12 is speaking of, but we assume it was an earring because the second stanza mentions the ear. The proverb is making the point that having a listening ear is beautiful, like having an earring of gold.

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Pro 25:13(top)
Pro 25:14(top)
Pro 25:15(top)
Pro 25:16(top)
Pro 25:17

“hate.” The word “hate” in the Bible does not always have the meaning it has in English, an intense feeling of animosity, anger, and hostility towards a person, group, or object. In Hebrew and Greek, the word “hate” has a large range of meanings. Here the word “hate” is used in the sense of “being disgusted or repulsed by” to the end that you would avoid your neighbor. [For more on the large semantic range of “hate” and its use in the Bible, see commentary on Prov. 1:22, “hate”].

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Pro 25:18(top)
Pro 25:19(top)
Pro 25:20(top)
Pro 25:21(top)
Pro 25:22(top)
Pro 25:23(top)
Pro 25:24(top)
Pro 25:25(top)
Pro 25:26(top)
Pro 25:27(top)
Pro 25:28(top)
  

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