Micah Chapter 4  PDF  MSWord

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Go to Bible: Micah 4
 
Mic 4:1

“It will come to pass in the last days.” In this context, the “last days” are the Millennial Kingdom. Having a vivid and living Hope is so important that verses about it spring up seemingly without warning throughout the prophetic books. Micah 4:1 is very similar to Isaiah 2:2 (see commentary on Isa. 2:2).

“the house of Yahweh.” That refers to the Temple, and since this is the last days, it is the Temple in the Millennial Kingdom, which is described in Ezekiel 40-43.

“lifted up above the hills.” The Hebrew word “lifted up” can also mean “exalted.” In this case, both meanings are true because in the Millennial Kingdom the mountain on which God’s Temple and the city of Jerusalem are located will be the highest mountain in the world, and also will be “exalted” in both a physical sense and spiritual sense. Other verses that say that Mount Zion will be the highest mountain include Isaiah 2:2 and Ezekiel 20:40.

[For more on the coming kingdom of Christ on earth, the Millennial Kingdom, see Appendix 3, “Christ’s Future Kingdom on Earth.” For more on the chronology of the Last Days, see commentary on Matt. 25:32. For more on the terrible death and destruction in the Great Tribulation and Armageddon, see commentary on Dan. 12:1. For more on the first and second resurrection, see commentary on Acts 24:15].

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Mic 4:2

“Many nations.” Micah 4:2 is almost identical to Isaiah 2:3. The Old Testament foretold that the Messiah would be a blessing both to the Jews and to the Gentiles, the “nations.” The first prophecy of the Messiah is the one God made to Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden in Genesis 3:15, and that was thousands of years before the Jews existed. About 2,000 years after that first prophecy of the Messiah, God promised Abraham that all the people of earth, not just the Jews, would be blessed through him (Gen. 12:3). Then God repeated that promise to Isaac (Gen. 26:4); and to Jacob (Gen. 28:14). Besides those promises, the Old Testament had a number of verses that spoke of Gentiles being included in the Messianic Kingdom, which meant they were granted everlasting life (Ps. 102:15; Isa. 2:2-4; 19:23-25; 42:6; 49:6; 51:4-5; 56:3-7; 60:3; 66:18-21; Ezek. 39:21, 27; Micah 4:2; Hag. 2:7; Zech. 8:22).

“to the house of the God of Jacob.” The “house” of God is the Temple, and there will be a temple in Jerusalem when Jesus rules the earth (see commentary on Ezek. 40:5, “of the house of God”).

“so that he can teach us about his ways.” Although Micah 4:2 and Isaiah 2:3 are about Christ’s Millennial Kingdom, there will be natural people in it who will marry, have children, and die, and those natural people will need to learn the laws of God. Jesus will be reigning as king in Jerusalem, which is why the law and knowledge of God will go forth from there. Those natural people will need to learn about God and His ways and laws.

[For more on the Millennial Kingdom of Christ on earth, see Appendix 3, “Christ’s Future Kingdom on Earth”].

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Mic 4:3

“and will decide concerning strong nations that are far away.” When Jesus Christ rules the earth from his capital city, Jerusalem, there will still be nations, or people groups that have leaders, all over the world. These groups will answer to the king, Jesus, as we see here in Micah 4:3, but they will be run by leaders who have been appointed by Jesus Christ.

[For more on Christ’s Millennial Kingdom, see Appendix 3, “Christ’s Future Kingdom on Earth.”

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Mic 4:4

“But they will sit, each person, under his vine and under his fig tree.” That everyone would sit under their own vine and fig tree is an idiomatic saying that expresses peace and abundance. The phrase does not mean that each and every person will have a grapevine and fig tree, but each person will have peace and joy. Grapevines and fig trees were two things that took years to grow and develop, so to say that individuals would have their own vines and figs indicated times of lasting peace. Also implied in the idiom is leisure and abundance. To have time to sit in the shade under a vine or fig tree and rest, eat, or chat with friends, portrayed time for leisure rather than having to work hard all day long under the hot sun. Micah 4:4 is a prophecy of the future kingdom of Christ on earth, and it shows that God’s original intention of having the earth be a wonderful place—an Eden-like Paradise—will be fulfilled in the future.

The figurative meaning of the phrase about each person sitting under their own vine and fig tree can be seen from its other uses in the Word of God. For example, the reign of Solomon was portrayed as a time when “Judah and Israel lived safely, every man under his vine and under his fig tree, from Dan to Beer-sheba, all the days of Solomon” (1 Kings 4:25). In general, the reign of Solomon was a time of unprecedented peace and abundance, but even in Solomon’s days there were slaves and other people without property or much leisure. Also, when Assyria attacked Jerusalem, the king of Assyria stated that if Jerusalem would surrender, then each person would eat of his own vine and fig tree (2 Kings 18:31; Isa. 36:16), but of course everyone knew that many of the people in Jerusalem did not even have a vine or fig tree. The Assyrians were simply making a statement that the people would live peaceful lives without fear of war if they surrendered.

Zechariah 3:10, which like Micah 4:4 is about Christ’s kingdom on earth, says that people will invite their neighbors to come and sit down under their vine and fig tree, which was simply a way of saying that people would invite others to their house for time of relaxation, conversation, and eating together.

[For more on Christ reigning as king on the future earth, see Appendix 3, “Christ’s Future Kingdom on Earth”].

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Mic 4:5(top)
Mic 4:6

“I will assemble...I will gather.” When Christ comes and conquers the earth and sets up his Millennial Kingdom on earth, he will gather Israel and Judah to the land of Israel. Here in Micah 4:6, God uses both the word “gather” and the word “assemble” to emphasize and reinforce that this will be a great move of God, not something people do. In this context, the words “gather” and “assemble” are used synonymously, and there are other texts where they are used together (cp. Isa. 11:12; Ezek. 11:17; Micah 2:12; 4:6).

[For more on the coming kingdom of Christ on earth, the Millennial Kingdom, see Appendix 3, “Christ’s Future Kingdom on Earth.” For more on Israel being gathered together in the future after Christ conquers the earth, see commentary on Jer. 32:37. For more on the chronology of the Last Days, see commentary on Matt. 25:32. For more on the terrible death and destruction in the Great Tribulation and Armageddon, see commentary on Dan. 12:1. For more on the first and second resurrection, see commentary on Acts 24:15. For more on people being dead when they die and not alive anywhere in any form, see Appendix 4, “The Dead are Dead”].

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Mic 4:7

“and Yahweh will reign over them on Mount Zion.” Yahweh will reign over the earth through his vice-regent, the Messiah, Jesus Christ (Ps. 2:6). [For more on Christ’s ruling over the whole earth, see Appendix 3, “Christ’s Future Kingdom on Earth”].

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Mic 4:8

“tower of the flock.” The “tower of the flock” (“Migdal-eder” in Hebrew) was a fairly common name for places that had built a sturdy watchtower from which to guard the flocks of sheep and goats. In Micah 4:6-8, Jerusalem is compared to a tower that could watch over and protect the sheep, and the lame and scattered sheep were coming to it. The picture is appropriate because in the End Times the Lord will gather his flock to the Promised Land.

“Daughter Zion.” The Hebrew is idiomatic for Zion itself, i.e., Jerusalem (see commentary on Isa. 1:8).

“Daughter Jerusalem.” The Hebrew is similar to that of Daughter Zion (see commentary on Isa. 1:8). In typical poetic fashion, Jerusalem is referred to twice in the verse by two different names, “Daughter Jerusalem” and “Daughter Zion.”

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Mic 4:9(top)
Mic 4:10

“Daughter Zion.” The Hebrew is idiomatic for Zion itself, i.e., Jerusalem (see commentary on Isa. 1:8).

“you will go out of the city and will live in the field, and will go to Babylon.” In this context, the “city” is Jerusalem and this is one of the earliest references to the Babylonian Captivity of Judah. It is around the time of the Assyrian captivity of Israel in 722 BC, but before it (cp. Micah 1:5-7). The Babylonian Captivity was also mentioned to Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:12-19; Isa. 39:1-7). The destruction of Jerusalem and deportation of its people is mentioned here in Micah 1:15-16; 3:12 and 4:10.

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Mic 4:11(top)
Mic 4:12(top)
Mic 4:13

“Daughter Zion.” The Hebrew is idiomatic for Zion itself, i.e., Jerusalem (see commentary on Isa. 1:8).

“I will make your hoofs bronze.” This is a zoomorphism, using the figure hypocatastasis and comparing Israel to a cow or ox treading grain. [For more on hypocatastasis, see commentary on Revelation 20:2].

“devote.” That is, devote them to Yahweh as an offering. [For more on things “devoted” to Yahweh, see commentary on Josh. 6:17].

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