Isaiah Chapter 64  PDF  MSWord

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Go to Bible: Isaiah 64
 
Isa 64:1(top)
Isa 64:2(top)
Isa 64:3(top)
Isa 64:4(top)
Isa 64:5

“righteousness.” In this context, “righteousness” is doing what is right to God and others (see commentary on Matt. 5:6).

“We have been in sin for a long time, and will we be saved?” This phrase is very unclear in the Hebrew text. Many scholars say the Hebrew text has been corrupted and there have been a number of emendations to the text that have been suggested to try to make the Hebrew more understandable, but the emendations are without textual support. Furthermore, the last sentence can be a statement or a question. The REV follows what some scholars believe is the most reasonable possibility that the text is saying (see John Oswalt, The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: The Book of Isaiah, Chapters 40-66).

One thing that seems clear from the context and scope of Isaiah is that the people are caught up in sin and cannot be saved on their own, but need God’s merciful intervention to be saved.

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Isa 64:6(top)
Isa 64:7

“made us melt.” “Made us melt” is the reading of the Masoretic Hebrew text, but many scholars think that the text was miscopied. The Septuagint, Syriac, and Aramaic targums read “handed us over” (“given us over”), and that may well be correct. If “melt” is correct, the idea is that the people are caught up in the power of sin (the hand of sin) and are powerless to escape on their own. That would be true, because only God can truly deliver people from their sin.

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Isa 64:8(top)
Isa 64:9(top)
Isa 64:10(top)
Isa 64:11

“is burned with fire.” This is a prophetic vision of the fate of the Temple due to Israel’s sin. It would be more than 100 years after Isaiah's time that the Babylonian king, Nebuchadnezzar, would literally burn the Temple down. However, the sin of the people was so great that God was not listening to their prayers or respecting their sacrifices, so the Temple may as well have been burned down (cp. Isa. 1:10-15).

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Isa 64:12(top)
  

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