Ecclesiastes Chapter 2  PDF  MSWord

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Go to Bible: Ecclesiastes 2
 
Ecc 2:1

“I said to myself.” See commentary on 1:16. The Hebrew phrase is slightly different but the basic meaning is the same.

“pointless.” See commentary on Ecclesiastes 1:2.

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Ecc 2:2(top)
Ecc 2:3(top)
Ecc 2:4(top)
Ecc 2:5(top)
Ecc 2:6

“groves.” The Hebrew is singular, but the Hebrew word can be large or small, like “forest.” But in English meaning, a “grove” is small, but the Sage made “pools” of water to water his “groves” of trees.

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Ecc 2:7

“born in my house.” This phrase refers to slaves, a point that is made especially clear when it is combined with “bought with his money.” Slaves could be bought, but also, the child of a slave was a slave who was “born in the house.” “Born in my house” does not mean that the slave was literally born in the exact house that the owner lived in, but rather that the slave mother was part of the extended household of the owner. [For more on “born in his house,” see commentary on Genesis 17:12].

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Ecc 2:8(top)
Ecc 2:9

“remained with me.” In Ecclesiastes 1:12 the Sage decided to search out by wisdom all that is done under heaven. In the process of doing that there were many things that could have derailed the Sage and/or corrupted him. Yet after exploring many things, including wine, works, wealth, and women, his wisdom remained with him.

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Ecc 2:10(top)
Ecc 2:11

“pointless.” See commentary on Ecclesiastes 1:2.

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Ecc 2:12(top)
Ecc 2:13(top)
Ecc 2:14

“has eyes in his head.” This phrase is idiomatic for the person being able to see where he is going.

“one event happens.” This one event is death. The Hebrew text emphasizes this by the figure of speech polyptoton, in this case juxtaposing a noun and verb with the same root. It is hard to reproduce clearly in English, but it might roughly be translated, “one happening happens to them,” or “one occurrence occurs to them.”

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Ecc 2:15

“Then I said to myself.” The Hebrew is more literally, “then I said in my heart,” but that is an idiomatic way of saying the person was talking to himself.

“pointless.” See commentary on Ecclesiastes 1:2.

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Ecc 2:16(top)
Ecc 2:17

“pointless.” See commentary on Ecclesiastes 1:2.

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Ecc 2:18(top)
Ecc 2:19

“pointless.” See commentary on Ecclesiastes 1:2.

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Ecc 2:20

“So I turned about.” This is a mental conclusion and crisis that the Sage arrives at by what he sees and experiences in life as he turned about and looked in different directions. Life without God leads to despair.

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Ecc 2:21

“pointless.” See commentary on Ecclesiastes 1:2.

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Ecc 2:22(top)
Ecc 2:23

“business.” In this context, “business” is used with the wider connotation of what someone does in life. What occupies his time, what he is “busy with.”

“pointless.” See commentary on Ecclesiastes 1:2.

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Ecc 2:24

“There is nothing better for a person than that he should eat and drink.” This is the first of many verses in Ecclesiastes that encourage people to rejoice and have fun in life (cp. Ecc. 2:24-25; 3:4, 12-13, 22; 5:18-19; 8:15; 9:7-9; 10:19; 11:7-8). The encouragement to enjoy life now is stated in the context of some other things that must be kept in mind. We are to rejoice now while we are alive because we will not be able to rejoice when we are dead.

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Ecc 2:25(top)
Ecc 2:26

“pleases him.” The Hebrew is idiomatic: “good to His face.”

“to give to the one who pleases God.” This is similar to Proverbs 13:22. This expresses an ideal situation, not what always happens in life.

“pointless.” See commentary on Ecclesiastes 1:2.

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